This summer’s anthem is…

Listen. If Kandi doesn’t do anything else, she is going to give you a catchy bop to sing along to. After all, this is the woman who penned “No Scrubs,” “Bills, Bills, Bills,” “Tardy for the Party,” “The Ring Didn’t Mean a Thing,” and who has writing credits on “Bug a Boo,” “There You Go,” and “U and Dat.” She knows her way around a hit.

‘Legs and hips and bawdeeeeee’: Kandi Burruss has given us our summer earworm

When I tell you O-T Fagbenle is a delight, please believe me

“I’m a man whose greatest wealth and honor is my family. That’s number one. I’m a person who cares a lot about young people,” he says. “…I guess I’m an artist. I’m a person who is driven to contribute stories to people, and I think in some ways the job of the artist is to reflect the most intimate parts of themselves to others.”

O-T FAGBENLE IS SHOWING US A DIFFERENT SIDE OF BARACK OBAMA ON THE FIRST LADY

America doesn’t care about Black women

“About a third of our population is African American; African Americans have a higher incidence of maternal mortality. So, if you correct our population for race, we’re not as much of an outlier as it’d otherwise appear. Now, I say that not to minimize the issue but to focus the issue as to where it would be. For whatever reason, people of color have a higher incidence of maternal mortality.”

Sen. Bill Cassidy proves America doesn’t care about Black women

Why are Black women always expected to be the bigger person?

Black women are always expected to turn the other cheek when it comes to the people who mistreat them. We are always expected to be the bigger person, to rise above it all and act like we are indifferent to the hateful speech, abusive behavior and gaslighting that goes on in situations like this. 

Black women don’t owe Kevin Samuels anything

For theGrio, I wrote about how Black women are being asked to show grace to Kevin Samuels in light of his death, despite the fact that he had none for Black women when he was living.

30 years later, policing in Los Angeles is still a problem

“Both the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department have horrible reputations and track records when it comes to their interactions with the residents of the city. The sheriff’s department, in particular, is known to be filled with internal gangs that target the city’s residents of color. The county sheriff himself is currently embroiled in a scandal in which it is alleged he attempted to cover up a video of a deputy kneeling on a handcuffed inmate’s neck—a case reminiscent of the murder of George Floyd.”

30 years after the 1992 Los Angeles Rebellion, policing in the city hasn’t changed much

Today is the 30th anniversary of the Los Angeles Uprising

“In April 29, 1992, the city of Los Angeles erupted into a state of civil unrest following the not guilty verdict in the trial of the Los Angeles police officers charged with the brutal beating of Rodney King. For six days, people angry about the trial’s outcome took to the streets, businesses were looted and the city burned. While the verdict was the final straw for many, the fuse for their anger was lit years before.”

30 years after the 1992 Los Angeles uprising, not enough has changed

Let’s celebrate 4/20 while remembering those held hostage by antiquated ‘drug’ laws

So I’m going to leave you with this: As you spark up today, put one in the air for brothers and sisters still locked down because they sold a dime bag. Blow one for the ones who just had a joint on them and got the most extreme forms of “justice” just because some judge could. Light one for all the soldiers in the struggle who are still serving time for the same thing a lot of white people are making millions off of now and getting away with it because they have a storefront. 

As we celebrate 4/20, let’s remember that the ‘weed man’ has been gentrified by white people

It’s all about the way we see ourselves

“First of all, I realize that my body is mine and mine alone. This means that no amount of outside messaging should be able to impact how I feel about myself. Coming to that realization was a process, and we all come to it at different times, but once you get there, it is the most liberating feeling in the world.”

I no longer wish to be ‘at war’ with my body
Continue reading “It’s all about the way we see ourselves”

White people lose their shit every Black History Month. Why?

The problem is that whiteness is centered so much in our world, people like this don’t know how to respond when it isn’t. White people don’t have to worry about their “culture” being left out of anything, because it’s always present, but they still complain when they can’t see themselves in something. They will even go so far as to insert themselves where they don’t belong.

Why Can’t We Just Enjoy Black History Month?

Harlem Nights is one of the greatest Black comedies of all time

“I remember the anticipation when Harlem Nights was coming out. We knew Eddie Murphy and Richard Pryor were putting together a movie for us by us. We knew it was going to be exceptionally funny. We had no idea what we were in store for.”

28 Days of Black Movies: ‘Harlem Nights’ is an all-star Black comedy classic
Continue reading “Harlem Nights is one of the greatest Black comedies of all time”

Waiting to Exhale is still a good watch all these years later

By the end of the film, these women are tired of the same old same old and ready to open themselves up to the possibilities, even if that means being single for a time until they find the right one.

28 Days of Black Movies: ‘Waiting to Exhale’ is the romantic drama in which sisters choose themselves
Continue reading “Waiting to Exhale is still a good watch all these years later”

I’d be willing to bet everyone loves Set It Off

“Cleo leads the police on a high-speed chase that ends with her being cornered by them. She lights a cigarette, takes a few pulls, and then gets out of her car and starts shooting at them. This is where my favorite phrase “Going out like Cleo” comes from because the police light her up, but she went out like a GANGSTER, OK?!”

28 Days of Black Movies: ‘Set It Off’ depicts a perfect example of what we mean by ‘ride or die’ friendships
Continue reading “I’d be willing to bet everyone loves Set It Off”

If you have never watched Sprung, it’s time you did

“Before we go any further, can we please talk about how underused Paula Jai Parker has been in the film industry? She is hilarious and generally eats up every scene she is in. She has a way of emoting and expressing things with her voice that makes her hysterical to watch. Her attitude, the way she rolls her eyes, rolls her neck and generally gives you that good hood sister attitude is something we got a peek of when she played Joi in Friday. In Sprung, she steals the show in my opinion.”

28 Days of Black Movies: ‘Sprung’ is a hidden gem among ’90s Black rom-coms
Continue reading “If you have never watched Sprung, it’s time you did”

When is the last time you watched The Wash?

“Dre and Snoop play Sean and Dee-Loc respectively, two friends and roommates who have just been served a three-day notice for eviction by their landlord. As if that isn’t stressful enough, Sean has also been laid off from his job at Foot Locker, and even if he wanted to go out and get a new job, how could he when there is a boot on his car? My man Sean was down bad, yo.”

28 Days of Black Movies: ‘The Wash’ is hoodtastic entertainment at its finest
Continue reading “When is the last time you watched The Wash?”

I think Tariq may be a better Ghost than his daddy

Ghost benefits from everything Kemp, the showrunner for both shows, learned from making its predecessor. She has the benefit of the experience of a highly successful six-season show, and with that knowledge comes vast improvements in the storytelling and the action. Couple that with the feedback the show regularly receives on social media, and the powers that be have given us fans exactly what we want on a weekly basis—an even better show.”

‘Power Book II: Ghost’ may be a better show than the original, and Tariq is a better Ghost
Continue reading “I think Tariq may be a better Ghost than his daddy”

What did you think of the new Sex and the City?

“Listen. We want to see ourselves reflected in the art we consume. I love Sex and the City, but there was a part of me that always knew the experiences reflected on the show were those of white women in their 30s and 40s, living a New York City life that made it possible for them to be completely oblivious that there were equally successful Black women walking around that city having similar experiences and conversations. I could never fully see myself in the show because we weren’t there.”

Representation Matters, But Not Like This

What are your plans for the new year?

If I am honest, I had a lot of plans for 2020 that fell by the wayside when the coronavirus took over. The initial shock of the moment turned into months of playing the lottery each time I went to the store, hoping to find things like disinfectant, toilet paper, and soap. Even when that part of the nightmare was over, we were still stuck inside and finding things to do that didn’t include eating my way through the refrigerator or giving my credit cards a workout became harder and harder. 

2020 II? 2020, Too? If 2022 is a do-over, I’m taking advantage